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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
, brother mike. four miles, the rough distance between the u.s. capitol and the pentagon. it can feel like a lot longer than that for chuck hagel today, as republicans gear up for a good old-fashioned grilling on his nomination for secretary of defense. one topic sure to come up is israel, which just launched an air strike in syria that u.s. officials say targeted a convoy of russian-made weapons that were headed for lebanon. now russia, the arab league, and hezbollah are all condemning the action. >>> and the new chairman of the senate foreign relations committee pays back $60,000 to a donor for airplane rides. and that donor is under investigation by the fbi. much more on a stranger sorry surrounding senator bob menen z menendez. good morning from washington. it's thursday, january 31st, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. now less than 30 minutes away from the start of chuck hagel's confirmation hearing to become the next secretary of defense. we'll take you there live for his opening statement, along with what's expected to be some tough questioning from some big-name r
rhetoric, or does north korea really have the capability to attack? pentagon correspondent barbara starr has all the details. >> reporter: north korea's latest sabre rattling. threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said it will lob missiles at the u.s. and conduct a new nuclear test, leaving no doubt leader kim jong-un isn't giving up his father's nuclear program. the u.s. might not is advanced warning of a new underground test. >> they have the capability, frankly, to conduct these tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing it. >> reporter: but there are signs they're ready to test if ordered. >> the north korean are maintaining a fairly high state of readiness at the test site. that means that if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> reporter: satellite imagery shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly. a bunker for personnel and equipment. and a communications network to make sure the order to detonate can be carried out. north korea's weapons
there was no distinct central africa command in terms of the way the pentagon cleaved the world. in 2007 there was africa command and it currently is stationed in europe, not actually in africa. there have been a variety of initiatives to train the soldiers of different african regimes, counterterrorism training, other kinds of training and in fact the soldiers of mali. mali was one of the star pupils in the -- >> and they're the same people now we're fighting. >> right. so i want to turn to mali in a second but first i want to push back -- not push back but to play devil's advocate about this intervention question on libya. when you look at all the negative consequences of libya, what do you say to the point about syria? everything that you could say about libya, weapons, destabilization, refugees, everything that's terrible about what has been the fallout of libya seems to me happening in syria as well where there hasn't been the same intervention and so maybe it's just the nature of the conflict as opposed to what the u.s. or the west does. >> no, that's a copout. it's not the nature
working at the nsc on detail and nato headquarters, the middle east and the pentagon. pentagon. he was adviser to four presidents, president obama asked them to lead his afghanistan-pakistan paula's review in early 2009, and do that for a couple of months before apple first returning to brookings. bruce has written two books in the time has been a, a third is about to come out and i will mention that in the second of the first two were about al qaeda and then about the is pakistan relationship. so the search for al qaeda, the deadly embrace, his new book coming out next month is avoiding armageddon. it's a story by the u.s.-india pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half-century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point, spent 34 years in u.s. army, retiring as a four-star general the summer 2010. he has been command in afghanistan. use the correct of the joint staff but perhaps the military circles most of all as i mentioned this five year period at joint special operations command makes a memorable and historic. general casey at his reti
in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets that provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogation program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. a few weeks later we captured a major player. ben-al-shib. he was a go-between. this was the key to all of that. we forget that it was not
including working at the n.s.c. on detail, at nato headquarters, brought at the middle east and the pentagon. he was advisor to four presidents, president obama asked him to lead his afghanistan-pakistan policy review in early 2009 and he did that for a couple of months before happily, for us, returning to brookings. bruce has written already two books in the time he's been here, actually a third is about to come out, i'll mention that in just a second, but the first two were about al qaeda and then about the u.s.-pakistan relationship "the deadly embrace." . his new book, coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon" and it's the story about the u.s.-india-pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point. spent 34 years in the u.s. army. retiring as a four-star general in the summer of 2010. he has been commander in afghanistan. he was the director of the joint staff. but perhaps in military circles, most of all, as i mentioned, this five-year period at joint special operations command makes him memorable
, the agencies, primarily the pentagon and the c.i.a. nominate people to be on the list. and it goes through what the white house promises is a very rigorous process of review to determine if those people should or should not be on the list. we don't know exactly what the standard is. but it involves a number of criteria, including whether the host country, the country in which this person, particular person is cooperative or not vis-À-vis capturing the person. in any event, they have a standard. names are nominated. it goes through an interagency process. and finally it makes it to the president. and he makes the final decision who is or is not on the list. does that sound like what you understand? >> i think that's certainly what the government has said happens. and, of course, this is the problem is that the only thing that we ever know about the counterintelligence stuff over the last 10 or 11 years has been, you know, what the government has been forced to say, what journalists have been able to find out, or what human rights organizations like ours have been able to find out on the ground.
, a new poll finds that the nation is strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement this week that women will now be able to serve in combat roles in the military. gallup report said 74% of people are in favor of the decision. those numbers hold up when you break them down by men and women as well. let me bring in democratic congress woman loretta sanchez, senior female member of the house armed services committee and homeland security committee. thank you so much for being here with us. why now is this time right time to do this? is it overdue would you say? is there something about it happening right now that's good timing? >> well, t.j., i've been fighting for about the last five or six years with a bill in the house to recognize what we already know. our women have been fighting in iraq and afghanistan. there is no frontline. everywhere is the frontline. they've been in combat. they've been killed. they're p.o.w.s. they've been wounded. and yet they have never received the recognition north pay nor the promotions due to the fact that they would be in combat. so it's long o
in iraq was much worse than it appeared from from afar. i was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu mus
was coming out of the pentagon. it was clearly unsettled. it looked much worse than we had thought. the first hope was that if we got saddam hussein, that would solve the problem. we made an effort to do that. appeared from from afar. in december, we picked up saddam. it became obvious that, as one of my guys described, a bunch of former miss -- regime guys were not really running the beginning of the resistance, the beginning of the insurgency. zarqawi had started to build a network that took trained people, or iraqi sunnis -- trained people, iraqi sunnis, who had been dislocated from their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he wa
-- september 1, 2001. there is smoke in the ground in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda @? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets of the provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogations program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. if you later -- if you sit recaptured a major player. he was a go-between. this was the key to all
, a billion dollars from special education. $3 billion from the pentagon's defense sfund. $7 billion from army operations. and earthworm does some work for the defense department. so earthworm could get hurt in this, couldn't it? >> that's right. the number one function of the federal government is to keep the people safe and representing the highest concentration of men and women in uniform, i can tell you that these cuts are irresponsible even if i believe we should reduce federal spending. it hurts job creation. there's a better path forward. and we should reduce it over time not over night. >> go ahead. >> there's no question about what he says it's true about the defense cuts. the secretary of defense said it would be catastrophic to let sequester hit the military for half a trillion -- >> but you still think it's an option -- >> half a trillion dollars. let me put the other side to you. i should add too that sequester doesn't do anything about the greatest underlying problem with regard to spending. and that has to do with the expansion of the welfare state and entitlement programs and t
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)